Cardiac Prevention

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Lower Your Risk
For Heart Disease

We can not control all the risk factors for heart disease. There are some such as family history, aging or previous heart attack that are out of our control. However, you can modify your lifestyle to treat these risk factors and reduce your chances of having a heart attack…
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The Facts on Coronary
Heart Disease

Plaque build up from cholesterol can begin as early as age 10 or even younger. This build up or process is known as atherosclerosis. It is the foundation for future coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women over age 35..
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Women and
Heart Disease

Atherosclerotic Heart Disease also known as Coronary Artery Disease isn’t found only in men. It has also become the leading killer of women, surpassing breast cancer several years ago. Women often develop heart disease later in life than men do. When it strikes, it is more deadly.
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Lower Your Risk For Heart Disease

We can not control all the risk factors for heart disease. There are some such as family history, aging or previous heart attack that are out of our control. However, you can modify your lifestyle to treat these risk factors and reduce your chances of having a heart attack.

  • Cigarette smoking. Tobacco use is the biggest risk factor for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and a heart attack. Seek help to quit smoking with new medications and minimize exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • High cholesterol. The risk of heart disease rises as cholesterol levels increase. To lower your cholesterol, eat less saturated fat and cholesterol and control your weight. Reducing your bad cholesterol can reduce your risk for a heart attack and stroke by 33%.
  • High blood pressure. Hypertension increases the workload the heart must do, causing it to enlarge and weaken over time. Get your blood pressure checked regularly, and follow your physician’s treatment plan if it is high.
  • Physical inactivity. Regular exercise can help prevent heart disease and help control other risk factors—including obesity, high cholesterol and diabetes, and high blood pressure.

A Harvard Medical School study reports that a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk for heart disease by 80 percent! Regular visits to your physician can help evaluate and guide the best plan for you!

The Facts on Coronary Heart Disease

Plaque build up from cholesterol can begin as early as age 10 or even younger. This build up or process is known as atherosclerosis. It is the foundation for future coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women over age 35 in the United States, but you don’t have to be its victim.

Although every person is different, there are several symptoms which should be evaluated immediately. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, arm pain, palpitations or even fatigue can be a warning sign. Some people may not have any symptoms until the disease has reached deadly proportions. It’s never too early to start combating the dangers of heart disease.Evaluation and prevention are the keys for your future.

Women and Heart Disease

Atherosclerotic Heart Disease also known as Coronary Artery Disease isn’t found only in men. It has also become the leading killer of women, surpassing breast cancer several years ago. Women often develop heart disease later in life than men do. When it strikes, it is more deadly.

There are certain health factors, especially menopause, that accompany women in older age, that can complicate the effects of coronary heart disease and increase a woman’s chance of death by heart attack or stroke.

Coronary heart disease now kills about twice as many women every year as all forms of cancer. Don’t be one of its casualties. See your physician about your risk for heart disease and start working on reducing your risks. It’s never too late to start combating the dangers of heart disease. You can slow the progress of the condition with healthy habits like plenty of exercise and a well-balanced diet.

FACTS

facts

Coronary Heart Disease kills 32% of American women.

43% of deaths in American women, or nearly 500,000, are caused by cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke) each year.

Heart attacks kill six times as many women as breast cancer.

31, 837 women die each year of congestive heart failure which is equivalent to 62.6% of all heart failure deaths.